Jack Hargreaves 沈如风

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Jack Hargreaves is a Chinese-English translator from East Yorkshire, now based in Leeds. Specialising in literary and academic translation, his work has appeared on Asymptote Journal, Words Without Borders, LitHub, adda, Paper Republic, and LA Review of Books China Channel, and includes writing by Zhu Yiye 朱一叶, Isaac Hsu 许顺镗, Yuan Ling 袁凌, Liu Xinglong 刘醒龙, Lu Yinyin 陆茵茵, Gerelchimeg Blackcrane黑鹤·格日勒其木格, Qiao Ye 乔叶, Liang Xiaosheng梁晓声 and Ye Duoduo 叶多多. He translated Shen Dacheng’s 沈大成 short story ‘Novelist in the Attic’ 《阁楼小说家》 for Comma Press’ The Book of Shanghai and, with Yan Yan, Li Juan’s 李娟 Winter Pasture 《冬牧场》 and Chai Jing’s 柴静 Seeing《看见》(forthcoming). His academic translations include A History of Chinese Philosophical Thought《中国哲学思想史》 by Zhang Xianghao 张祥浩 and Buddhism and Buddhology《中国佛教与佛学》 by Hong Xiuping 洪修平.

Jack is a member of the Paper Republic 纸托邦 management team and is ALTA’s 2021 Emerging Translator Mentee for Literature from Singapore; his project for the programme is a translation of Chia Joo Ming’s 谢裕民 Reconstructing the Image of Nanyang 《重构南洋图像》.

 

Read Now: On Paper Republic

The Nursing Home Rightist by Yuan Ling October 11, 2019
Silent Children by Yuan Ling October 04, 2019

Read Now: Around the Web

民国二十四年的荷兰水 adda

Book Publications

Winter Pasture cover

Winter Pasture

Li Juan

February 05, 2021

Original Works

Short story (1)

All Translations

Short story (1)

Novel (1)

Article (2)

The Paper Republic database exists for reference purposes only. We are not the publisher of these works, are not responsible for their contents, and cannot provide digital or paper copies.

Posts

Newsletter Issue Fourteen: the Festiv(al) Season

By Jack Hargreaves, June 11, '22

Folks, not to brag, but I've all but stopped using social media for a month now (by circumstance rather than by choice) and it's been a lovely holiday for the mind. It also means, in case you're wondering why my boasting is relevant, this month's newsletter is a short one. That's right, like many millennials, I source most of my news from the socials, and that includes Chinese-lit related news.

Here's to a more jampacked newsletter next month, when I inevitably fall back into old habits.

In the meantime, direct your attention toward the upcoming Aberdeen Festival of Translation. By upcoming, I mean it starts on Monday 13th June with a workshop led by Nicky Harman. But there is plenty more to come.

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Newsletter Issue Thirteen: Really Pushing Our Luck Posting This Today...

By Jack Hargreaves, May 12, '22

Happy Friday y'all!

This issue comes with a set of brilliant answers to questions we put to three Chinese-Spanish translators, as a continuation of our previous collab with their respective translator collectives. See those answers here. We hope to have more collaboration with Chinese translators and publishers into more languages besides Chinese, so if you fall into one of those categories, feel free to get in touch.

First, let me direct your attention to the great events there are coming up, which for the first time in a long time are all in person. So Londoners and Copenhageners, get to booking.

Oh, and remember news of Han Song's new novel Hospital, coming out from Amazon Crossing (read our chat with acquiring editor Gabriella Page-Fort here? We've got a look at the striking cover, check it out!

Enjoy perusing!

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Stephen Spender Prize for poetry in translation 2022 opens for entries on 4 May

By Jack Hargreaves, April 11, '22

Stephen Spender Prize for poetry in translation 2022 | Opening for entries on Wednesday 4 May, closing 15 July

Translate any poem from ANY language into English, and win cash prizes! Language lovers and budding poets of all ages are warmly invited to take part in the 2022 Stephen Spender Prize for poetry in translation, with categories for young people (14-and-under, 16-and-under and 18-and-under) and an open category for adults.

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Newsletter Issue Twelve: Duck!

By Jack Hargreaves, April 11, '22

Duck! Here comes your erratic, out of the blue newsletter on all things Chinese lit in translation.

Now, I know what you're thinking, it hasn't been a month since the last one. But bear with us, we're still finetuning how long we have between each edition before they become unwieldy. So here is a petite, slimline edition.

Happily, it's still as nutritious as ever, chocker with links to good news, good writing* and good times.

*poetry in particular this time around!

A quick reminder first that Bristol Translates and BCLT Summer School are still open for applications. The former will have Nicky Harman and me (Jack Hargreaves) teaching the Chinese strand, swapping and changing between the classes from the mornings to the afternoons; the latter has Jeremy Tiang running the Literature from Taiwan workshop alongside Writer-in-Residence Kan Yao-Ming.

Now for the news:

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Newsletter Issue Eleven: Springtime newstime

By Jack Hargreaves, March 20, '22

Hello one and all, this month's newsletter is packed with stories, poems and, much more so than usual, top notch podcasts for your all reading and listening pleasures. We'd also like to plug another newsletter we've been reading and loving recently, The Slow Chinese 每周漫闻, which is a resource to help you learn, use, and understand Chinese language the way people speak it today. The link there is for one recent instalment, but there are many, many more you can choose from on the site.

Also, some of you may have noticed in our annual roll call for 2021 that, for the first time, we included links to lists of published translations into other languages besides English. We would like to do more to promote and work with translators and publishers of Chinese fiction working in other languages, so this month we have the pleasure of sharing a roundup of news about Chinese literature in Spanish, from China traducida y por traducir in collaboration with DIGITRANS, which can be found beneath the usual news pieces. Unfortunately, some of the events mentioned in this roundup have already passed, but do keep your eyes out for similar happening in the future.

And last but certainly not least, just in case you've managed to miss the announcement, the Paper Republic Guide to Contemporary Chinese Literature is out now and available to purchase in paperback and ebook form. Known affectionately as The Guide, the publication features detailed biographical entries covering almost 100 of the most important writers working in the Chinese language today, alongside in-depth essays on topics like the role of the author, women's writing and Sci-Fi. We've already held one successful launch event in partnership with Aberdeen University Confucius Institute, and we have another coming up on Wed April 27th with China Institute, as well as one more in the works for anyone who is London-based (keep your eyes peeled for details about that). If you have questions or issues re: buying the Guide or registering for the event, please don't hesitate to get in touch with us at info@paper-republic.org

Thanks for reading!

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Mo Yan Speaks: A Conversation with the Editor

By Jack Hargreaves, February 6, '22

A few of us had the pleasure of hearing Shiyan Xu speak at the launch of Paper Republic's latest Reads series, Figures in a Landscape, a partnership with Perspectives in the Arts and Humanities Asia to present short stories from their double issue dedicated to Nanjing literature. We thought a conversation with her about her most recent book, Mo Yan Speaks: Lectures and Speeches by the Nobel Laureate from China, would make for the perfect next feature. Enjoy!

You can buy the book here

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Newsletter Issue Ten: A Roaring New Year

By Jack Hargreaves, February 4, '22

Hello one and all. The title is my favourite of the New Year's related wordplay I've seen so far -- a happy and fortune-filled one to you, by the way -- but if you've heard or come up with better, please share it in the comments below.

This month's feature is a conversation with Shiyan Xu, a professor of English at Nanjing Normal University and Deputy Editor-in-Chief for Chinese Arts and Letters, who late last year had a compilation of the Nobel-Prize-winning author Mo Yan's speeches and lectures published with Cambria Press. Shiyan edited the collection, which she worked on with a number of translators and experts. A few of the team had the pleasure of hearing Shiyan speak at the launch of Paper Republic's latest Reads series, Figures in a Landscape, a partnership with Perspectives in the Arts and Humanities Asia to present short stories from their double issue dedicated to Nanjing literature.

You can find our conversation here and buy the book here.

On to the news!

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Han Song's "Hospital" Trilogy: A Chat with the Acquiring Editor

By Jack Hargreaves, January 10, '22

We were very excited to see this tweet promising an upcoming Han Song publication from Amazon Crossing. While the book is a ways out from publication yet, we thought it would be interesting to talk to Gabriella Page-Fort, Editorial Director of Amazon Crossing, who acquired the title, and ask her a few quick questions about how and why she picked it up. Now we’re looking forward to it even more!

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Newsletter Issue Nine: New Year, New Newsletter

By Jack Hargreaves, January 9, '22

Happy New Year everyone! We hope you've found time for rest, relaxation and recuperation over the festive period -- a slowing down of things, if only briefly. And with another new year only just around the corner, this is a period of transitions, whether smooth or difficult, so here we are with very little segue, the first feature of 2022, a conversation between Eric and the editor of a number of books we were over the moon to see will be coming out in translation next year.

But first, remember to sign up here if you'd like to receive this newsletter in all its email glory!

In fact, signing up is the only way you're going to have longer features like this one laid out top-to-tail for your perusal. Otherwise, we'll be posting them on a separate page on the site for you to access, like this month's conversation which you can find here!

Also, tomorrow (Tuesday, Jan 10) marks the launch of a new collab, with Perspectives in the Arts and Humanities Asia: a special double issue on Nanjing literature & art, from which we'll be publishing six new translations of work by Nanjing authors, including Han Dong, Su Tong and Cao Kou. So make sure to check the website every Tuesday over the next few weeks to catch the newest instalment in our Read Paper Republic series.

And in other news:

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Newsletter Issue Eight: Signing off for 2021

By Jack Hargreaves, December 6, '21

Hello and happy holidays y'all. I say that now, since the newsletter has settled into a regular monthly release for the time being, and this is the last you'll hear from me until the New Year. In the meantime, the PR team will get to planning the features for 2022, so if there's a subject you'd like to see us zoom in on -- be it an author, upcoming release, recent trend, anything Chinese lit related really -- please send your suggestions to us at news@paper-republic.org and remember, you can sign up for the email version of this newsletter here.

My choice picks from this edition are, in no particular order, Chaoyang Trap House's evolving dictionary of the Chinese internet, because it taught me a new phrase, the new episode of "Sinophone Unrealities", because Natascha Bruce, Dorothy Tse and birds, and the LitHub excerpt from Lydia Davis' new book of essays on translation, because, well, because...

"In translating, you are forming phrases and sentences that please you at least to some extent and most of the time. You have the pleasure of working with sound, rhythm, image, rhetoric, the shape of a paragraph, tone, voice. And [...] you have this writing pleasure within the island of the given text, within its distinct perimeter."

On to 2022!

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Newsletter Issue Seven: ALTA mentee #1

By Jack Hargreaves, November 12, '21

Hi all, sporadic newsflash time. Last week was the American Literary Translators Association conference, so for something a little different before the links, I thought I'd speak to fellow ALTA mentee, Jenna Tang (Chieh-Lan Tang), about her work.
Under the guidance of editor and translator Mike Fu, Jenna has been translating Taiwanese author Lin Yi-Han’s debut novel Fang Si-Chi’s First Love Paradise, which, as an unflinching depiction of rape culture and misogyny as foundational to social stability, was instrumental in the start of the #MeToo Movement in Taiwan. Jenna has already finished the translation and is on the lookout for a suitable publisher, so watch this space.
Jenna chose the book because of how close to home its contents feel for her. She attended the same university as Yi-Han and says she can relate to experiences the author describes of corruption within the Taiwanese educational system and of the dangers that haunt female students day to day yet constantly get overlooked.
Jenna's plan now that the program has come to an end, besides enjoy the conference this week and continue her literary translation journey, is to start a column about literary translation, multilingualism, and home & languages, focusing more on her own writing as well as giving space to spotlighting the work of other translators with book reviews. Again, watch this space!

Thanks Jenna! Looking forward to seeing more of your work in the future, we'll always feature it here.

We'll be developing this editorial feature in future issues, so please share if there is anyone/anything you'd like us to talk to in more detail. And if you'd like to receive those future issues straight into your inbox, remember to subscribe here.

Back to our regularly scheduled programming:

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Newsletter Issue Six: The Last Quarter (of the Moon?)

By Jack Hargreaves, October 18, '21

Hi all! I'm going to keep the intro short here for the purpose of expediency - I have deadlines - but fear not, the next issue will contain a big, nutritious portion of editorial.

Top of the agenda are imminent events which will be missed if not signed up for ASAP. First to note is this year's symposium by the Leeds Centre for New Chinese Writing (happening this weekend!), and second is translator Christina Ng's online seminar "Translating Multilingual Texts", which Catapult have kindly offered our readers a 20% discount for, code below. This doesn't mean the other events are not worth attending, far from it, but I'll let you peruse the offerings below at your leisure.

New and aspiring translators, please direct your attention to the news that applications for the 2022 ALTA Emerging Translator Mentorship Program are open! I am now at the tail end of a mentorship with Jeremy Tiang and it has been, and I say this sincerely, a life-changing program. Get applying!

Beyond that there are shining reviews of new and upcoming books (and a not-so-shining review of Jia Zhangke's latest documentary), a story from the NEW PATHLIGHT ISSUE, extracts from Chen Qiufan's forthcoming book and from Chan Yu-Ko's Whisper, and a whole host of interviews with HK & Taiwan authors and translators. And, naturally, so much more... it's an exciting world out there isn't it!

Remember that you can sign up for the email version of this newsletter here and receive it straight into your inbox as soon as it comes out.

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