How dull to have a gun and not shoot. Guns should be fired.

Fu Yuli / Nicky Harman

The Little Red Guard, by Wenguang Huang (reviews)

Stepping forward in time through this month's round-up, Wenguang Huang has written a powerful memoir reflecting on how events of the past can shape present circumstance. The Little Red Guard tells the story of how Huang's family, during Mao's China, is faced with a dilemma: his grandmother's coffin. In a country that has banned a traditional burial for its deceased, Huang's grandmother wants nothing other than to be buried beside her husband after death. Religious, cultural, and political sectors churn in upheaval, while this integral symbol of the past must be guarded. The Little Red Guard has already had many wonderful reviews from The Tribune, WSJ, Publisher's Weekly, and many more. Without a hitch, this poignant memoir makes our list for the books to be devouring this month.


# 1.   

I can't get the Publishers Weekly link to work, so here it is:

Helen Wang, June 2, 2012, 5:12a.m.


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