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Chinese Literature in Translation

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A quarterly literary journal featuring translations of the best contemporary Chinese fiction and poetry.

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Chinese Arts and Letters: Call for Submissons

Chinese Arts and Letters, a literary and academic journal, solicits English-language contributions for issue No. 3. Texts not exceeding 10,000 words will be considered, consisting of translations of contemporary Chinese-language literature in any genre, essays on the Chinese arts and letters of any era, and creative writing in any genre about China. Translated texts or inquiries for translations must also submit the original Chinese text, and all translations will be reviewed for accuracy and style. Payment for contributions is 0.80 RMB per word (contributions) or per Chinese character (translation), before tax. Texts with a focus on Jiangsu may be given special consideration.

Please address inquiries or submissions to the editors at chineseartsletters@gmail.com or chineseartsletters@163.com The deadline for inquiries for issue No. 3 is December 31, 2014; the deadline for submissions is January 31, 2015.

By Eric Abrahamsen, September 15 '14, 2:28a.m.

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Chinese Books Go Global: M & A Coming Soon to Your Home Country?

When you have trouble moving product overseas -- and cash in your pocket -- you can always call on a classic strategy: take control of the distribution channels.

There are four traditional ways to do so: set up your own local firm; invest in a local firm; merge your firm with a local firm; or simply acquire an existing player in that market which owns a respected brand name.

Is China getting ready to do so in the publishing field, as part of its soft power push?

More…

By Bruce Humes, September 14 '14, 8:35p.m.

5 comments, viewed 31 times

Public Talk, and Translation Masterclass With Author Yan Ge 颜歌 and Translator Nicky Harman

Copied from Writing Chinese website:
Saturday November 1st, 2014. Public talk @11am – 1pm. Translation masterclass@ 2pm – 5pm. Venue to be announced (University of Leeds)

For our morning event, which is open to the general public (no registration required), author Yan Ge and her translator Nicky Harman will be talking about their work together. Yan Ge’s novella White Horse, translated by Nicky, will be released in October by Hope Road Publishing. And for a taster of more of Yan Ge’s work and why Nicky recommends it so highly, have a look at this recent article in Words Without Borders.

Our afternoon event is a literary translation masterclass, led by the author and her translator, and is open to anyone interested in the translation of contemporary Chinese fiction into English.

The masterclass is free but registration is required. If you’d like to attend, please email us at writingchinese@leeds.ac.uk. We will then email all attendees in advance with the text that we’ll be translating on the day.

We’re also pleased to announce that the masterclass will be followed by the launch of the Bai Meigui Literary Translation Competition. More details to follow soon!

By Helen Wang, September 8 '14, 2:26p.m.

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New Goodreads list: China Fiction Book Club

China Fiction Book Club (Twitter @cfbcuk) is now on Goodreads.com. We are on their lists - Listopia - and can be found by typing in any of a number of keywords e.g. Chinese + translated + fiction. The point of it is to get an open-access list of published translations onto Goodreads. So... get posting, people! You can also vote for books already listed (Helen and I put up 20 or so, just to get the list started) if you want.

By Nicky Harman, September 3 '14, 11:07a.m.

1 comment, viewed 58 times

If I Were a Political Cartoonist

If I were a political cartoonist, of the WWII-era ilk where they label everything in the cartoon so the point gets across better, I would draw a cartoon to illustrate China’s “Going Out,” the policy which is meant to bring Chinese culture to the rest of the world, and it would look something like this:

A patch of land representing China; in the center stands The Leader (it says that on his chest). He gazes off into the distance, one hand pointing outwards in the best 指点江山 style, and the words “Going Out Policy” are written on that sleeve. The other hand is loading sumptuous food onto crescent tables to either side of him. The food could be labeled “Government Budget,” but that should be self-explanatory. Seated around the outside of the tables are a host of people we could label “Government Functionaries,” until I think of something better.

The functionaries are shoveling food into their mouths, their gazes fixed in rapt devotion upon The Leader. They’ve all scootched backwards until their rear ends hang out over the border of China, and they’re saying things to The Leader like: “We have ‘Gone Out,’ and it is wonderful!,” and, “The foreigners are all amazed!”

Meanwhile, a few big-nosed foreigners (in berets and cowboy hats!) are standing around the outside of the border, looking at this line of plumber’s cracks, and asking each other, “What on earth are they trying to tell us?”


If only I could draw…

By Eric Abrahamsen, September 3 '14, 12:18a.m.

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China Writers Association Translation Fund – Some News

Towards the end of last year, the China Writers Association announced the inception of two new literary translation funds, one for general fiction, and the other specifically for minority fiction. Many applications were submitted, and then we all commenced to wait. And wait, and…

We started to suspect that the whole thing had foundered on some hidden bureaucratic sandbar, but just recently we heard that the program is, in fact, still under way – not only that, the CWA is actually ready to announce its first round of winners. Not announce, exactly: the winners will be contacted on the down-low. We're trying to convince them that publicizing the full list is in everyone's best interest, but it's not clear if that argument will take.

If you applied for funding, and have been chosen, expect to get that news "soon". The translators among you will know how to translate that "soon" into English. You publishers can probably also figure it out.

If you applied and didn't get it… you may never know! Unless we can talk them into publicizing the list.

By Eric Abrahamsen, August 25 '14, 6:30a.m.

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Winners Announced: China International Translation Contest

Winners of the "2013 China International Translation Contest," co-hosted by the State Council Information Office, Chinese Writer Association and the China International Publishing Group, have been announced. According to 国际翻译大赛, the organizing committee provided 30 pieces of contemporary Chinese short stories from which to choose, and 1,006 renditions were received from over 30 countries in English, French, Spanish, Russian and Arabic.

More…

By Bruce Humes, August 24 '14, 3:06p.m.

13 comments, viewed 173 times

CELT Deadline Extension

The deadline for the CELT translation training course has been extended to August 18 (2014), since (for reasons I personally cannot fathom) the number of applicants to date has amounted to something less than a tidal wave.

I want to emphasize what a worthwhile thing this is: personally, the two courses I attended were not only the most helpful things I've done for my development as a translator, they were also instrumental in the solidification of a society of C-E literary translators, a social circle or support group, a mafia even. And needless to say they were a hell of a lot of fun. So do it, already!

See below, and after the jump, for more details:

The Chinese English Literary Translation course will run from 22nd to 27th September 2014 in the Yellow Mountains. The course will offer a mix of literary translation and creative writing workshops, with guest speakers.

More…

By Eric Abrahamsen, August 12 '14, 6:48a.m.

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CELT Rides Again

The notorious – nay, infamous – Chinese-English Literary Translation course is coming around for its third incarnation this coming September (2014). For five days, translators and writers will gather in Huangshan to pick each other's brains, watch each other work, and try to teach each other a little something. Be part of the event that has launched so many illustrious translation careers! Or at least, introduced some fairly interesting people to one another.

This time, the course is being run by the Foreign Languages Teaching and Research Press (FLTRP), in partnership with the British Centre for Literary Translation (BCLT), and SAPPRFT.

The course will be held this fall, September 22 to 27. The application deadline is August 10: be sure to send your completed application form and a scan of your passport to translation@fltrp.com before then. Attendance free, but you'll have to get yourself there, and also pay for room and board (I had this wrong intially, my apologies!).

The Chinese-to-English writers and workshop leaders are:

  1. Li Juan, 李娟, led by Andrea Lingenfelter
  2. Li Pingyi, 李平易, led by Bonnie McDougall
  3. A Yi, 阿乙, led by Eric Abrahamsen

For more information about the course, you can download the full information sheet.

By Eric Abrahamsen, July 21 '14, 4:30a.m.

7 comments, viewed 140 times

Free Word Centre, London, 21 July 2014

If you're in London, come and join a lively discussion about the possibility and impossibility of translation, at the FreeWordCentre. Joining Xiaolu Guo for the evening's discussion are her editor-turned-agent Rebecca Carter, and Free Word's former Translator in Residence Nicky Harman. Together, they'll use the novel, I am China as a starting point to explore questions of translation, censorship, Chinese culture, and what it means to call a country your home. Book in advance. It's 21 July 7pm.

By Nicky Harman, July 10 '14, 4:40a.m.

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Call for Academic Translators in the Humanities

My contact with China-focused academic presses has increased substantially over the past three months or so, and each one of them has come back looking for Chinese to English translators qualified to take on academic projects, usually monographs on topics in the humanities -- Chinese social science, political economy, literary history and theory are just a few examples. Sourcing translators for academic work can be harder than sourcing for trade, for reasons I'll list below, so I thought I would put out an open call here to get everyone's attention.

More…

By Canaan Morse, July 9 '14, 11:38a.m.

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International Translation Day, British Library, 26 September 2014

Save the date.

Booking here: http://www.bl.uk/whatson/events/event162774.html

By Nicky Harman, June 13 '14, 12:49p.m.

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Call for China-based "Translator-in-Residence" Program

I recently made a number of suggestions on concrete steps that could help ensure greater success for the “campaign to take Chinese literature global.” They are detailed in Open Letter to China Literary Exports, Inc..

中华读书报 (China Reading Weekly) interviewed me about my proposal, including the establishment of a Translator-in-Residence program. If you'd like to read the interview (in Chinese), and see the part of the draft text that was deleted just before publication, visit 建议建立驻地翻译基金,积极征募外国翻译家到中国短期居住.

By Bruce Humes, June 12 '14, 11:51p.m.

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Accessibility?

We're not blocked, are we? 'Course, it's hard to tell these days, they seem to be blocking most everything…

By Eric Abrahamsen, May 24 '14, 4:06a.m.

4 comments, viewed 88 times